Courses and Registration

Courses and Registration

How to Register for CTS Courses

  • All CTS Core courses, except CTS 395, will meet in the Given Courtyard Building, Room S359. CTS 395 will meet in MedEd 306.  CTS Elective courses have varying meeting locations.  See current syllabus or registrar listing for meeting location.

  • You will need a UVM Student ID number and MyUVM log in (NetID and password) to register for courses.  If you need a number, pre-register with Registrar at https://learn.uvm.edu/register2/

  • Registration requires instructor permission whether taken for credit or not. This process involves sending a request for permission to register for a CTS course to the course instructor with your UVM student number.

  • Once you are granted instructor permission, you may register via the UVM Registrar's website on your MyUVM.

Cost of Courses and Payment Options

Cost

Tuition Payment Options

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CTS Core Course Schedule

Fall Semester

Course Title Credits Instructor
CTS 301 Designing Clinical & Translational Research 3 Kennedy
CTS 308 Intro to Research Management I 3 TBD
CTS 320 Analyzing Clinical & Translational Research 3 Pinckney and Callas
CTS 305 Cell to Society (Semester 1) 2 Rubin
CTS 310 Conducting Clinical & Translational Research 3 Rubin
CTS 395 Special Topics: TBD 3  

 
Spring and Summer Semesters

Course Title Credits Instructor
CTS 306 Cell to Society (Semester 2) 2 Rubin
CTS 309 Intro to Research Management II 3 TBD
CTS 325 Multivariate Analysis of Clinical & Translational Research 3 Pinckney and Callas
CTS 315 Reporting Clinical & Translational Research 3 MacLean
CTS 301 Designing Clinical & Translational Research (Summer Session) 3 Kennedy
       

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CTS Core Course Descriptions

CTS 301 Designing Clinical & Translational Research 

(3 Credits, Instructor: Amanda G. Kennedy, PharmD, BCPS)

The goal of this course is for participants to learn how to write their own research protocols suitable for submission to an Institutional Review Board or funding agency. Each session covers part of the protocol design process such as choosing a question, picking a design, selecting measurement instruments, minimizing bias, identifying subjects, estimating sample size, designing an analytic plan, avoiding ethical problems, and finding funding sources. Each session includes presentation of a textbook chapter [Hulley SB, et al. Designing Clinical Research: An Epidemiologic Approach, 3rd ed. Williams and Wilkins,Philadelphia, 2006], review of assigned readings from the medical literature, class discussion, and student presentations of their own research protocols. The final sessions are devoted to a mock study section that closely mimics the NIH study section process.

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CTS 308/309 Intro to Research Management I/II

(3 Credits, Instructor: TBD)

This course is designed for beginning research coordinators, research managers, or research assistants who need to learn how to prepare and manage clinical and translational research protocols.  Coordination of industry-sponsored, investigator-initiated, and National Institutes of Health-sponsored research will be covered.  The course is taught as a small group semianr, with assigned readings and homework.  Students will work with example protocols to develop study budgets, determine study feasibility, prepare for site and initiation visits, manage recruitment and enrollment, collect and monitor data, track and report adverse events and protocol deviations, and learn to utilize tools of the trade important for managing clinical research.  This course will be divided into two semesters.  Semester one will focus on the preparation skills necessary to make a research protocol active.  Semester two will focus on coordinating and managing an active research protocol.

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CTS 305/306 Cell to Society I/II

 (4 credits, Coordinator: Alan Rubin, MD)

This novel multidisciplinary course, presented over 2 semesters follows the development of a medical intervention from its basic science origins through animal models, early translation to humans, large-scale clinical trials, initial introduction and marketing, to a consideration of the problems of integration into routine practice, late discovery of adverse effects, and cultural and economic barrier to diffusion.

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CTS 310 Conducting Clinical and Translational Research

 (3 credits, Instructor: Alan Rubin, MD)

This course is designed for new investigators and others wishing to learn the ethics, regulatory requirements, and practical considerations for undertaking a clinical research project. Example topics include: Protecting human subjects; Research with vulnerable populations; Roles, rules, and mechanics of the IRB; Recruitment, compensation, and consent of subjects; Data safety and monitoring; Planning and carrying out surveys and interventions; Conflicts between research and care for individual patients; and, Legal issues in clinical research-authorship, collaboration and conflict of interest. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to present and defend a proposal before an Institutional Review Board (IRB). The class functions as a mock IRB as it considers proposals and problems designed to illustrate many facets of conducting research. Students present their own protocols before the "Board" as a final class project.

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CTS 315 Reporting Clinical and Translational Research

 (3 credits, Instructor: Charles MacLean, MD)

This course is designed to develop communications skills for writing, editing, and presenting clinical and translational science. The course prepares students to master five presentation formats: abstracts, posters, brief oral presentations, full-length presentations such as Grand Rounds or seminars, and research reports/journal articles. The course explores American Medical Association standards for publication style and terminology [Iverson 1998] using a text written by experienced clinical investigators [Browner 1999]. The course uses a three-session cycle for each of the five formats. The ethics of publication and the potential conflicts and pitfalls of authorship are also covered.

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CTS 320 Analyzing Clinical and Translational Research

 (3 credits, Instructors: Richard Pinckney, MD, MPH and Peter Callas, PhD)

This course is designed to provide basic analytical skills for clinical and translational research. Prior clinical research experience is helpful but not required. The course assumes no prior statistical experience and mathematics is kept to a minimum, requiring comprehension at the high school algebra level. Content includes basic data considerations, descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, and bivariate analyses. Classes provide a small group interactive seminar approach with "hands on" analyses using the statistical software package STATA. Analyses of ample datasets are completed on a weekly basis. Specific datasets are provided, but students are encouraged to bring their own datasets to use throughout the course. Lectures are available online.

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CTS 325 Multivariate Methods for Clinical and Translational Research

 (3 credits, Instructors: Drs. Peter Callas and Richard Pinckney)

This intermediate course builds upon the descriptive and bivariate statistical methods presented in Analyzing Clinical Research. Emphasis is on developing the foundational skills and knowledge for using regression analytical techniques based on the correlational aspects of clinical data. The conceptual and applied applications of correlational and regression analyses to clinically relevant research datasets are the focus of the course while keeping mathematics to a minimum of basic college-level algebra. Specific datasets are provided along with encouragement for students to incorporate their own research datasets into the course. Class assignments involve actual computer analyses illustrating the concepts discussed in class while allowing students the flexibility of choosing datasets and variables that are of specific interest.

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CTS Elective Course Schedule

Fall Semester  

Course Title Credits Instructor
CTS 271 Intro to Biomedical Informatics 3 Sarkar and Chen
CTS 275 Informatics Practicum Independent Study 3-12 Chen and Sarkar

 

Spring and Summer Semesters

Course Title Credits Instructor
CTS 272 Applied Biomedical Informatics 3 Chen
CTS 275 Informatics Practicum Independent Study  3-12 Chen and Sarkar
CTS 295 Health Economics 3 Jones
CTS 302 Quality in Health Care  3  van Eeghen

 

CTS Elective Course Descriptions

CTS 271 Intro to Biomedical Informatics

 (3 credits, Instructors: Indra Neil Sarkar, PhD, MLIS and Elizabeth Chen, PhD)

This survey course provides an overview of the field of biomedical informatics covering relevant topics in computer sicence, health care, biology, and social science.  Particular emphasis will be given to understanding the organization of information in biomedicine and healthcare, the effective management of this information using computational approaches, and the impact of such approaches on biomedical research, education, and patient care.  Discussions of approaches and methods in biomedical informatics will be complemented with hands-on experience with existing resources and systems, including those used in biological, clinical, and public health contexts.  The final capstone project of this course will require the in-depth examination, critique, and presentation of a specific topic in biomedical informatics, ideally within the context of student (biomedical, healthcare, or computational) interests.

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CTS 272 Applied Biomedical Informatics

 (3 credits, Instructors: Elizabeth Chen, PhD)

This course provides a pragmatic coverage of topics and resources relevant to biomedical informatics.  Throughout the semester, students will be exposed to real-world examples and skills related to the effective use of data, information, and knowledge in biomedicine and healthcare.  Computing skills include Unix, programming (Ruby), databases (MySQL), and Web services; examples will involve a range of data sources (e.g. clinical, biomedical, and public health) and emphasis will be given to issues such as standardization, privacy and security, and handling unstructured data.  Through assignments and a course project, students will gain hands-on experience in developing and applying informatics solutions in biomedical and healthcare settings.

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CTS 275 Informatics Practicum

 (3-12 credits, Coordinators: Elizabeth Chen, PhD and Indra Neil Sarkar, PhD, MLIS)

This practicum experience aims to provide opportunities for students to develop and apply informatics skills and knowledge in a real-world setting.  These experiences may either take the form of a research or service project in biomedicine or healthcare.  Based on the student's interests (that may range from bioinformatics to clinincal informatics to public health informatics), the course coordinators will assist in identifiying an appropriate project and mentor/supervisor as well as faciliate the overall practicum experience.  Potential informatics opportunities include those within academic untis at the University of Vermont, Fletcher Allen Health Care, State of Vermont agencies, area healthcare technology entities, and regional collaborators.

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CTS 295 (BSAD 295) Health Economics

 (3 credits, Instructors: Christopher Jones, PhD)

Healthcare spending is skyrocketing around the world.  The U.S. spends more on healthcare than does any other nation.  Will spending in one direction come at the expense of another?  As states and governments struggle to control healthcare expenditure in the face of new drugs, expensive technologies, chronic disease and ageing populations, the field of health economics is experiencing a boom.  You are about to enter an era when every aspect of healthcare will be measured, evaluated and subjected to scrutiny based on cost.  In this course, you will gain knowledge needed to digest and critically appraise studies in health economics.  By course end, you will be able to distinguish between alternative forms of health economic evaluation and command an up-to-date understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of various health economic techniques.  The course is designed to give you an introduction to health economic priniciples that should be as useful to the future business leader or healthcare professional as to any long-term beneficiary of healthcare reform.

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CTS 302 (NH 302) Quality in Health Care

 (3 credits, Instructors: Constance O. Van Eeghen, PhD)

This interprofessional course provides students with the skills and knowledge needed to apply quality improvement approaches to the design and management of health care services. This course will introduce students to the principles and practices of health care quality improvement.  Students will learn how to use these principles in the design and management of continual improvement activities.  Faculty will present theories and concepts of quality measurement, management and patient safety in the context of their application in a variety of health care delivery settings and organizations.  The end goal is to prepare each student for a role in managing change from personal, team, organizational, and system perspectives in order to improve continually the quality of care in which s/he is involved.  Offered by the Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Science.

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Non-CTS Elective Course Descriptions

(Suggested elective options though students are not limited to these options.  Students may choose electives from the UVM Graduate Course Catalogue and request approval for elective credit by their CTS advisor)

CDAE 351 Research Methods

 (3 credits, Instructors:Thomas Patrick DeSisto)

Developing research projects with the scientific methods; evaluating alternative literature review, sampling, surveying, and analytic methods; and reporting the results

Prerequisite: Three hours of statistics

Offered by the Community Development and Applied Economics Department

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PA 325 Health Care Policy

 (3 credits, Instructors: Meg O'Donnell, Steven Jerome Kappel)

This course addresses policy issues affecting the structure, performance and change in the U.S. health care system, with a specific focus on the role of health care managers.

Pre/co-requisite: CDAE 102 or CDAE 124 or instructor permission

Offered by the Public Administration Department

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PH 301 Public Health and Health Policy

 (3 credits, Instructors: Jan Carney)Course focuses on current public health issues, barriers to improving population health, and policy tensions between science, economics, education, politics, government, media, and public health.

Offered by the Public Health Department

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 PH 396 Special Topics-Epidemiology

 (3 credits, Instructors: Matthew Thomas)

Epidemiology is the study of disease distribution and determinants in populations; we will define populations and estimate the distribution of health-related conditions and their determinants.

Offered by the Public Health Department

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 SOC 274 Qualitative Research Methods

 (3 credits, Instructors: Dale J. Jaffe)

Principles of qualitative research design and ethics and data collection, analysis, and presentation.  Students will complete a research project over the course of the semester.  The focus of this course is on qualitative methods of research and analysis.  This involves the observation and study of people in their "natural" everyday settings.  The main objective is for you to learn how to go about doing this sort of research by reading about qualitative methodology, conducting your own original research project, and discussing your experiences, discoveries, and dilemmas with your classmates.  During the course of the semester, you will select a setting for study, create field notes on participant observation, develop an interview guide and conduct a small number in-depth interviews, learn how to analyze these date, and write a qualitative research report.

Section Expections:  The entire course is structured around the conduct of student research projects.  All of your work will be geared toward the preparation of a qualitative research report which is due at the end of the semester.  Lectures, readings, weekly assignments, and class discussions will provide you with the tools to successfully complete this project.  Final grades are based on attendance, participation, quality of weekly assignments and an assessment of the final paper.

Prerequisites: 6 hours of sociology including SOC 001 and 100, or instructor permission

Offered by the Sociology Department

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 STAT 200 Med Biostatistics and Epidemiology

 (3 credits, Instructors: Peter Callas, PhD)

Introductory design and analysis of medical studies.  Epidemiological concepts, case-control and cohort studies.  Clinical trials.  Students evaluate statistical aspects of published health science studies.  STAT 200 covers the design and analysis of epidemiologic studies, including descriptive studies, cross-sectional designs, case-control studies, cohort studies, and randomized controlled studies.  Computational methods include calculation of measures of disease frequency (incidence, prevalence) and measures of association (e.g. relative risk, odds ratio, attributable risk). Study issues include evaluating the role of chance, selection, bias, information bias, confounding, and effect modification in interpreting research findings.  STAT 200 does not cover specific computational details of statistical tests but rather focuses on interpretation of the results of such tests.  The required text for Fall 2012 is Oleckno, WA. Epidemiology:Concepts and Methods. Long Grove, IL:Waveland Press Inc., 2008. ISBN 1-57766-522-8

Section Expectations: Course sessions will generally consist of lecture covering new material and discussion of one or more assigned journal articles from the biomedical literature.

Evaluation: Grades are based on homework, exams, written project evaluation in assigned epidemiologic study, in-class presentation evaluating a study chosen by the student, and class participation (attendance and contribution to in-class discussion)

Prerequisite: STAT 111, 141, or 211. 

Cross listed with BIOS 200

Offered by the Statistics Department

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 STAT 211 Statistical Methods I

(3 credits, Instructors: Douglas Dickey)

Fundamental concepts for data analysis and experimental design.  Descriptive and inferential statistics, including classical and nonparametric methods, regression, correlation, and analysis of variance.  Statistical software. 

Prerequisite: Junior Standing

Offered by the Statistics Department

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 STAT 381 Statistical Research

 (3 credits, Instructors: Jeff Sandor Buzas, Ruth Mickey, Mun Shig Son)

Methodologic or data analytic research culminating in oral and written reports to the faculty.

Prerequisite: Permission

Cross listed with Biostatistics 381

Offered by the Statistics Department

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Program Contact Information

Alan Rubin, M.D.

(T): 802-656-8228

Alan.Rubin@uvm.edu

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